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Dec 15
What Does It Mean to Practice Inclusion in Science?

I realized the world is mine. I can do whatever I want. But I still experience intimidation and fear being in a scientific field because communication is not accessible in that context. And so, I was deciding whether I should pursue my education in biochemistry or in another field, and someone said to me, 'Go forth with your education in whatever field you want.'

—Dr. Amie Fornah Sankoh

In a new episode of Microgreens, the MPMI journal podcast, Dr. Tiff Mak and Dr. Dominique Holtappels interview Dr. Amie Fornah Sankoh, who highlights the importance of mentorship and disability justice in science. Amie shares her journey to becoming the first deaf, black woman to receive a doctorate in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) discipline in the United States.

A full transcript to the audio recording of the interview can be found here. A video version of the recording will be released later for audiences to experience and engage with Amie through sign language.​

Dec 15
Catch up on Recently Recorded MPMI Virtual Seminars
Sep 18
Introducing the H. H. Flor Distinguished Review in MPMI

Timothy L. Friesen, Editor-in-Chief Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions

For each gene that conditions reaction in the host there is a corresponding gene in the parasite that conditions pathogenicity.

In these words, Harold H. Flor summed up his gene-for-gene concept in his 1971 Annual Review of Phytopathology article (Flor 1971). Flor's gene-for-gene concept provided a new framework for how we think about plant–microbe interactions. Harold H. Flor was born May 27, 1900. He obtained a B.S. degree in agriculture in 1922, an M.S. degree working on covered smuts of small grains in 1924 and was granted a Ph.D. degree for his work on root rot complex of sugar cane in 1929—all three degrees from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Flor then took a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Pullman, WA, where he worked on wheat bunt. In 1931, he moved to Fargo, ND, to take a position with the USDA on the North Dakota State University campus, where he was tasked with studying diseases of flax. It was during his time with the USDA in Fargo that he performed his landmark research on the flax–flax rust interaction, which ultimately was used to define the gene-for-gene hypothesis that became so prevalent in describing many host–pathogen interactions. The gene-for-gene concept still stands as one of the most significant contributions to plant pathology and was established long before modern molecular biology or even a complete understanding of genetic material or protein–protein interactions.

Based on the landmark research performed by Dr. Flor, it was an obvious choice to use his name to help define what this distinguished review category is all about. An H.H. Flor Distinguished Review is a review written by visionary scientists who have also changed the way we think about an area of molecular plant–microbe interactions. These distinguished reviews will ultimately include all categories of plant–microbe interactions from pathogenic to symbiotic interactions. It is our intent to invite leaders in the MPMI field to write authoritative reviews that provide not only a historical perspective but also to provide a vision for where their respective fields are moving, ultimately providing a valuable resource to the MPMI community.

In the August issue of Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions, the first of the H.H. Flor Distinguished Reviews will be published, including "From Gene-for-Gene to Resistosomes: Flor's Enduring Legacy," written by Peter N. Dodds and "New Biochemical Principles for NLR Immunity in Plants," written by Jijie Chai, Wen Song, and Jane E. Parker.

Sep 18
Final Call for Papers! Submit Your Research on Effectors

04WhatsNew_FI2024.jpgDon't miss the chance to have your latest findings on effectors published in the open access MPMI Focus Issue "Effectors at the Interface of PlantMicrobe Interactions." 

This focus issue will present the latest developments in the study of microbial effector biology and evolution in the context of plant immunity across diverse systems. As the scientific community seeks to respond to global challenges in agriculture and food production, this focus issue will highlight potential solutions and technology emerging from research on microbial effectors. 

Editors Melania Figueroa, Gitta Coaker, and Kostya Kanyuka invite research and review articles that explore the complex role of effectors in molecular plant–microbe interactions. Articles highlighting translational research, as well as fundamental understanding, are welcome. 

Submissions are due by the end of September 2023. 

Submit Now!​ 


Jun 28
MPMI Journal Publishes Special Focus Issue on a Critical, Emerging Area of Study

The recently publisheMPMI Focus Issue on The Plant Endomembrane System in Molecular Plant–​Microbe Interactions explores how microbes affect the plant endomembrane system and its role in plant disease, defense, and beneficial interactions.

Focus Issue Editors Tessa M. Burch-Smith, Aiming Wang, Eunsook Park, Hailing Jin, and Dong Wang are pleased to share a focus issue that discusses a critical aspect of plant–microbe interactions that will surely be an area of more intense research in coming years. Read all articles for free today!

Focus Issue Articles

Editor's Pick: Arabidopsis Dynamin-Related Protein AtDRP2A Contributes to Late Flg22-Signaling and Effective Immunity Against Pseudomonas syringae Bacteria
Gayani Ekanayake, Michelle E. Leslie, John M. Smith, and Antje Heese

Manipulation of the Host Endomembrane System by Bacterial Effectors
Hyelim Jeon and Cécile Segonzac

Pathogen-Derived Extracellular Vesicles: Emerging Mediators of Plant–Microbe Interactions
Zhangying Wang, Jiayue Zeng, Jiliang Deng, Xiangjie Hou, Jiefu Zhang, Wei Yan, and Qiang Cai

A Close Look into the Composition and Functions of Fungal Extracellular Vesicles Produced by Phytopathogens
Marina F. Maximo, Taícia P. Fill, and Marcio L. Rodrigues

Extracellular Vesicles in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives
Samuel Holland and Ronelle Roth

Realizing the Full Potential of Advanced Microscopy Approaches for Interrogating Plant–Microbe Interactions
Kirk J. Czymmek, Keith E. Duncan, and Howard Berg

A Medicago truncatula Cell Biology Resource: Transgenic Lines Expressing Fluorescent Protein–Based Markers of Membranes, Organelles, and Subcellular Compartments
Sergey Ivanov, Dierdra A. Daniels, and Maria J. Harrison


The MPMI editorial board also looks forward to the 2024 MPMI Focus Issue “Effectors at the Interface of Plant-Microbe Interactions."

Learn more about publishing in this special issue.

Jun 28
Opportunity for Scientists in Under-Resourced Countries to Publish in MPMI

Microbes Biosciences has generously sponsored MPMI to cover the publication fees for a limited number of authors from countries with low-income or lower-middle income economies (as defined by The World Bank) who elect to publish in MPMI. To apply for a fee waiver, scientists from under-resourced countries must contact MPMI Editor-in-Chief Tim Friesen in advance of their submission and include a detailed cover letter about their submission.

Waivers are available on a first-come, first-served basis, and each manuscript must undergo the standard peer-review process and be accepted for publication. Learn more about how to submit your manuscript.

​Thank you to Microbes Biosciences for its gracious support of our science!

Mar 21
Now Expanded—The Parameters for Publication in MPMI

To bot​h refine and broaden the mission of MPMI, Editor-in-Chief Tim Friesen and his editorial board have revised the journal's overview, scope, and newly acceptable content.

New Overview

Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions (MPMI) publishes peer-reviewed fundamental and advanced applied research on the genetics, genomics, molecular biology, biochemistry, and biophysics of pathological, symbiotic, and associative interactions of microbes, insects, nematodes, or parasitic plants with plants.

New Scope

MPMI publishes cutting-edge research that investigates the molecular mechanisms of plant interactions with other organisms, including pathogens, pests, and beneficial microbes. The journal communicates novel findings that significantly advance our molecular and cellular understanding of these plant-associated interactions.​

New Acceptable Content for MPMI

  • Molecular and cell biological analysis of relevant factors involving the plant-associated organism or the plant alone or molecular analysis of components that affect or modulate plant–microbe interaction
  • Genetic analysis (fundamental or applied) that advances knowledge of plant and/or plant-associated organism interactions
  • Molecular evolution and molecular ecology of interactions between plants and other organisms
  • Comparative genomics of organisms associated with a plant–microbe interaction
  • Research addressing molecular aspects of symbiotic and associative relationships with plants
  • Spatial and temporal analyses of the cell biology of plant–microbe interactions, including studies focused on light and/or electron microscopy
  • Technical advances (methodological), if they report important novel advances in technology for studying the molecular aspects of plant–microbe interactions mentioned above

Consider submitting your next paper to MPMI, the official journal of IS-MPMI. IS-MPMI members receive a discount to publish in MPMI. Beyond gold open access publication, MPMI offers virtual presentation opportunities and an official podcast, Microgreens, to enhance reader engagement worldwide. The journal's association with two scientific societies (MPMI is also a member journal of The American Phytopathological Society) results in dual marketing efforts, which exposes your work to a wider audience.

If you are unsure whether your manuscript is appropriate for MPMI, you are encouraged to submit a presubmission inquiry to Editor-in-Chief Tim Friesen describing the significance of your findings.

View information for authors here.
Mar 21
Publishing in April: The MPMI Focus Issue on The Plant Endomembrane System in Molecular Plant–Microbe Interactions
Take a first look at five of the papers in this Special Issue and stay tuned for more.

Extracellular Vesicles in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives
Samuel Holland and Ronelle Roth

A Close Look into the Composition and Functions of Fungal Extracellular Vesicles Produced by Phytopathogens
Marina Maximo, Taicia P. Fill, and Marcio Rodrigues

Arabidopsis Dynamin-Related Protein AtDRP2A Contributes to Late flg22-Signaling and Effective Immunity against Pseudomonas syringae Bacteria
Gayani Ekanayake, Michelle E. Leslie, John McGill Smith, and Antje Heese

Manipulation of the Host Endomembrane System by Bacterial Effectors
Hyelim Jeon and Cecile Segonzac

Pathogen-Derived Extracellular Vesicles: Emerging Mediators of Plant–Microbe Interactions
Zhangying Wang, Jiayue Zeng, Jiliang Deng, Xiangjie Hou, Jiefu Zhang, Wei Yan, and Qiang Cai​

Mar 21
Call for Papers! Publish in the MPMI Focus Issue on Effectors at the Interface of Plant–Microbe Interactions

Effectors are central to determining the complex and dynamic interaction between plants and microbes. Whether those interactions re​​​​sult in the establishment of a beneficial or negative interaction, effectors are at the interface of any plant–microbe interaction.

Despite their role as mediators of plant–microbe interactions, gaining a full understanding of the biology and evolution of these intriguing molecules has been a challenging task. This MPMI Focus Issue will present the latest developments in the study of microbial effector biology and evolution in the context of plant immunity across diverse systems. As the scientific community seeks to respond to global challenges in agriculture and food production, we wish to highlight potential solutions and technologies emerging from research in microbial effectors.

We invite research and review articles that explore the complex role of effectors in molecular plant–microbe interactions. Articles highlighting translational research, as well as fundamental understanding, are welcome. We look forward to assembling an issue that features the excellent research in this area!

Benefits to Authors

A Focus Issue offers authors several benefits. A single-topic issue gives scientists an opportunity to publish alongside the related work of their peers to highlight progress in a focal area. The Effectors at the Interface of Plant–Microbe Interactions MPMI Focus Issue will be widely promoted and is expected to be highly cited, giving authors maximum exposure.

Articles will be submitted to Crossref, allowing citation tracking and connectivity as this research area moves forward in MPMI and other scientific journals.

If you are working on research described herein, submit your manuscript to MPMI and select "Focus Issue" as the article type. Please also indicate in your cover letter that you would like your manuscript to be considered for the 2024 Focus Issue.

For more information about the scope of this issue, please contact MPMI Editor-in-Chief Tim Friesen.​

​​​​Submit a Manuscript Instructions to Authors

Dec 21
Celebrate a Great Year of MPMI Science: Most Cited and Most Read Articles Published in 2022

Most Cited

EffectorP 3.0: Prediction of Apoplastic and Cytoplasmic Effectors in Fungi and Oomycetes
Jana Sperschneider and Peter N. Dodds

Identification of Adhesins in Plant Beneficial Rhizobacteria Bacillus velezensis SQR9 and Their Effect on Root Colonization
Rong Huang, Haichao Feng, Zhihui Xu, Nan Zhang, Yunpeng Liu et al.

OsRAM2 Function in Lipid Biosynthesis Is Required for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Rice
Ying-Na Liu, Cheng-Chen Liu, An-Qi Zhu, Ke-Xin Niu, Rui Guo et al.

The Mechanosensitive Ion Channel MSL10 Modulates Susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana
Debarati Basu, Jennette M. Codjoe, Kira M. Veley, and Elizabeth S. Haswell​

Most Read

Recognition of Microbe- and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns by Leucine-Rich Repeat Pattern Recognition Receptor Kinases Confers Salt Tolerance in Plants
Eliza P.-I. Loo, Yuri Tajima, Kohji Yamada, Shota Kido, Taishi Hirase et al.

EffectorP 3.0: Prediction of Apoplastic and Cytoplasmic Effectors in Fungi and Oomycetes
Jana Sperschneider and Peter N. Dodds

Cell-to-Cell Communication During Plant–Pathogen Interaction
Naheed Tabassum and Ikram Blilou

Plant–Microbiota Interactions in Abiotic Stress Environments
Natsuki Omae and Kenichi Tsuda

Growth Promotion of Giant Duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza (Lemnaceae) by Ensifer sp. SP4 Through Enhancement of Nitrogen Metabolism and Photosynthesis
Tadashi Toyama, Kazuhiro Mori, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Michihiko Ike, and Masaaki Morikawa

Influence of Flagellin Polymorphisms, Gene Regulation, and Responsive Memory on the Motility of Xanthomonas Species That Cause Bacterial Spot Disease of Solanaceous Plants
Maria L. Malvino, Amie J. Bott, Cory E. Green, Tanvi Majumdar, and Sarah R. Hind

Production of Agrocinopine A by Ipomoea batatas Agrocinopine Synthase in Transgenic Tobacco and Its Effect on the Rhizosphere Microbial Community
Aiko Tanaka, Maarten H. Ryder, Takamasa Suzuki, Kazuma Uesaka, Nobuo Yamaguchi et al.

Microscopic and Transcriptomic Analyses of Dalbergoid Legume Peanut Reveal a Divergent Evolution Leading to Nod-Factor-Dependent Epidermal Crack-Entry and Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation
Bikash Raul, Oindrila Bhattacharjee, Amit Ghosh, Priya Upadhyay, Kunal Tembhare et al.

RNAi-Based Gene Silencing of RXLR Effectors Protects Plants Against the Oomycete Pathogen Phytophthora capsici
Wei Cheng, Menglan Lin, Moli Chu, Guixiang Xiang, Jianwen Guo et al.

Involvement of Arabidopsis Acyl Carrier Protein 1 in PAMP-Triggered Immunity
Zhenzhen Zhao, Jiangbo Fan, Piao Yang, Zonghua Wang, Stephen Obol Opiyo et al.​

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